Man O’ Pairts: The Scots Whay Hae! Podcast Talks To Kevin P. Gilday…

For the latest podcast Ali headed to Glasgow’s Tron Theatre to talk to poet and polymath Kevin P. Gilday about his Edinburgh Fringe show ‘Suffering From Scottishness‘, his new collection of poetry ‘Sad Songs For White Boys‘ (right), his work with Cat Hepburn as the instigators and organisers of spoken word house party Sonnet Youth, his band Kevin P. Gilday & the Glasgow Cross, and a whole lot more.

It’s a fascinating chat, one which, when taken as a whole, is an instructive insight into what it takes to make your living as an artist today. All that and Kevin reads his poetry as well – we always aim to please!

If you are new round these parts there is quite a substantial back-catalogue of podcasts for you to discover. If you aren’t yet a subscriber you can do so, (or simply listen) at iTunes, on Podbean, or by RSS (but you’ll need to have an RSS reader to do so). 

You can also download the podcast by clicking on the relevant link to the right of this post, or, if you want it right here, right now, you can listen on SoundCloud

..or on YouTube:

The next podcast will be with you very soon, but in the meantime you can also check out our series of Scottish Opera Podcasts.

Fringe Benefits: Scots Whay Hae!’s Top 10 Picks Of The Edinburgh Fringe…

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August means Edinburgh, and there is so much on offer that it can be tough to separate the wheat from the cultural chaff. You can peruse the full programme here, but to give you some guidance here are Scots Whay Hae!’s pick of the Fringe. There’s comedy, theatre, music and more – hopefully, something for everyone.

2017MOREMOI_T4Alan Bissett – (More) Moira Monologues –  Scottish Storytelling Centre
After two sold-out Edinburgh Fringe runs, straight-talking single mum Moira Bell returns in a new instalment of Alan Bissett’s much-loved one-woman show. Moira’s a gran now, but still telling hilarious home-truths about dating, her estranged sister, cleaning posh folk’s hooses, the return of her ex Billy, and Brexit.

UnknownGary McNair – Letters To Morrisey – Traverse Theatre (Venue 15) ​
It’s 1997. You’re 11. You’re sad, lonely and scared of doing anything that would get you singled out by the hopeless, angry people in your hometown. One day you see a man on telly. He’s mumbling, yet electrifying. He sings: ‘I am human and I need to be loved, just like everybody else does’. You become obsessed with him. You write to him. A lot. It’s 2017. You find those letters and ask yourself: ‘Has the world changed, or have I changed?’. Gary McNair returns after his award-winning sell-out show A Gambler’s Guide to Dyingwww.madeinscotlandshowcase.com

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Irvine Welsh & Dean Cavanagh – Performers – Assembly Rooms (Venue 20)
Making its debut in Edinburgh, Performers is a black comedy from Irvine Welsh and Dean Cavanagh. The longtime collaborators have turned their attention to 1960s swinging London and the making of the film Performance, a violent and trippy cult film that starred Mick Jagger and James Fox. The play revolves around two gangsters auditioning for roles and how far they will go to impress. Sexuality, identity, memory and Francis Bacon are examined as the pair try to make sense of the situation they have found themselves in. In 1960s swinging London, naked ambition trumps everything. Continue reading

Animal Magic: The Scots Whay Podcast Talks Tyke…

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For the latest podcast, Ali went to Edinburgh to meet writer Rebecca Monks in the very aptly named Circus Cafe to talk about her latest play, Tyke.  It is based on a tragic and true tale which some of you may be aware of, it promises to be one of the highlights of this year’s Edinburgh Fringe, and it’s available to all as part of the Free Fringe.

We also spoke to Tyke’s co-directors, Madison Maylin and Madelaine Cunningham from Black Sheep 13465935_760726547363707_6399035500877242826_n (1)Productions,  to learn about the practicalities of staging such a show, bringing the character of Tyke (see below and right) to life, and just  what drew them to collaborate on this play.

We then conclude matters with Rebecca by way of a discussion on the wider Edinburgh Fringe with reference to her work at the The List magazine, and more generally about the arts scene in Scotland today.  All together it makes for a fascinating listen, and we hope you enjoy.  Continue reading