City Of Culture: The Scots Whay Hae! Podcast Visits Dundee…

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For the latest podcast Ali visited Dundee to talk about all things cultural in relation to that great city. To help him do so he was joined by the co-founding director of Creative Dundee Gillian Easson, the writer and playwright (and long-term supporter of SWH!) Anna Stewart, and the TV and theatre actor, (currently to be seen on the brilliant drama ‘The Terror‘ on AMC) Gordon Morris.

All three are proud Dundonians who have close connections with the city’s culture. They talk about the past, present, and their future hopes for the city and its artistic community, examining how it has become an internationally renowned centre for the arts while remaining determinedly committed to engaging with its citizens. It’s a fascinating discussion which gives a great overview of a place, its people, and its culture. Continue reading

Scots Whay Hae!’s Alternative Hogmanay Night In, 2017…

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Once again Montgomery Scott raises a glass to see out the old year and ring in the new and that means it’s time for Scots Whay Hae!’s annual selection of New Year’s Eve treats. It’s an alternative to the Hogmanay telly, so if there’s little you fancy on the box there might be something here to your liking.

There’s audio, video, music, comedy, documentary, drama, and more involving some of our favourite folk, including Vic Galloway, Muriel Spark, Alan Cumming, Forbes Masson, Benny Lynch, Peter Mackie Burns, Vikki Reilly and Kristian Kerr, Pocket Knife, Sandie Shaw, and Hamish Imlach. How’s that for a guest list? There’s quite a lot to get through, so without further ado….

We’re going to kick off with a radio documentary from Uncle Vic Galloway all about the past, present, and hopefully the future of Glasgow’s iconic Barrowlands Ballroom, with music from Iggy Pop, Public Enemy, Franz Ferdinand and more. Click the link below for the full programme:

Vic Galloway’s Barrowlands

Next is the chance to watch the infamous film version of Muriel Spark’s novella The Driver’s Seat, which stars Elizabeth Taylor, Ian Bannen, and a cameo from Andy Warhol! You can read Ali’s thoughts on The Driver’s Seat in the latest issue of The Bottle Imp, which may help you decide if the film is for you or not – but, for better or worse, you won’t see a movie like this for some time:

A wee treat now – some rare footage of Kelvinside’s Victor & Barry performing at the Edinburgh Fringe back in the day, with messrs Cumming and Masson on the finest of form. Not the best quality, but that’s VHS for you:

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Scots Whay Hae!’s Alternative Hogmanay Night In, 2016…

montgomery_scott_enjoying_a_glass_of_scotch
Once again Montgomery Scott raises a glass to see out the old year and ring in the new and that means it’s time for Scots Whay Hae!’s annual selection of New Year’s Eve treats. It’s an alternative to the Hogmanay telly, so if there’s little you fancy on the box this might be more to your liking.

There’s audio, video, music, comedy, documentary, drama, and more involving some of our favourite folk, including The Blue Nile, Robbie Coltrane, John Byrne, David Hayman, Ette, Peter Ross, The Primevals, and Lomond Campbell. That’s quite a lot to get through, so without further ado….

Perhaps the least surprising recommendation to regular readers will be journalist Ken Sweeney’s documentary on The Blue Nile (which he talked about in detail to the Glasgowist). He starts at the band’s very beginning, and tries to understand why, with a mere four albums to their name in 20 years, they are so beloved by some, yet unheard of or ignored by others. If you are in the latter camp and would like to know more about them then I can recommend Allan Brown’s Nileism: The Strange Course Of The Blue Nilebut not before you listen to the following – and, more importantly, their music. It just may change your life:

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Stoned & Dethroned: You Have Been Watching…Stonemouth

The driving idea behind Scots Whay Hae! has always been to celebrate the best of Scottish culture and art, which means that by definition we usually don’t write about the failures. There are people paid to do that, and life is too short to do it otherwise. However, I feel that the recent BBC adaptation of Iain Banks’ 2012 novel Stonemouth cannot be allowed to pass without comment as the great man deserves better than this.

The story revolves around Stewart Gilmour and his return to the titular town of Stonemouth for his best friend Calum’s funeral. This follows years of banishment for cheating on Calum’s sister, Ellie. Their father is a local gangster, Don, who had chased Stewart out and who has decreed he can return for a few days while the funeral happens before continuing his exile. Stewart begins to believe that there is more to Calum’s death than meets the eye. However, this may be because he feels he needs to do something as he is wracked with guilt after ignoring his friend’s previous pleas for help.

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