New Gold Dram: The Scots Whay Hae! Podcast Talks To Film Director Andrew Peat…

For the latest podcast Ali met up with the film director Andrew Peat at Glasgow’s CCA before the Glasgow Film Festival premiere of his feature-length documentary Scotch: The Golden Dram.

To give you an idea about the film, and what they discussed, here is an extract from the press-release:
“Shot entirely on location in Scotland, Scotch: The Golden Dram tells the story of uisge-beatha, Gaelic for “water of life”, which is enjoyed in more than 200 countries, generating over $6 billion in exports each year. The film charts the Cinderella tale of legendary master distiller Jim McEwan, a veteran with over 50 years standing in the industry, who takes on a dilapidated distillery on his home island of Islay in the Inner Hebrides and turns it into an award-winning blend. Some of the other ardent enthusiasts featured include Richard Paterson, a master blender whose nose was insured for $2.5 million, as well as biochemist whisky-maker Dr Bill Lumsden, and master distiller Ian MacMillan. “

The two discuss the inspiration behind the film, and the personal and professional journey Andrew has made to get his film to screen, from his first taste of Glenmorangie while at University at St Andrews to that night’s showing in Scotland, a highly significant landmark for Andrew Peat (right).

You can visit the website here – Scotch: The Golden Dram where you will find the full list of cinemas in Scotland, Ireland and the rest of the UK where it’s playing, starting in Aberdeen on the 8th March.

It’s a beautiful film which is funny, moving, poignant and powerful and, even if you have no interest in the drink, the people and places will win you over and stay with you long after the credits roll. It’s also visually stunning and if you get the chance to see it on the big screen I suggest you don’t miss it.

Here is the trailer:

If you are new round these parts there is quite a substantial back-catalogue of podcasts for you to discover. If you aren’t yet a subscriber you can do so, (or simply listen) at iTunes, on Podbean, or by RSS (but you’ll need to have an RSS reader to do so). You can also download the podcast by clicking on the relevant link to the right of this post, or, if you want it right here, right now, you can listen on SoundCloud

..or on YouTube:

The next podcast will be something a little bit different, and rather special, so don’t go too far…

Lights, Camera, Action!: A Preview Of Glasgow Film Festival 2019…

If it’s February in Glasgow it can only be the Glasgow Film Festival, the perfect place for the more discerning film fans to take shelter from the storm while enjoying the best cinema has to offer, old and new.

Running from tomorrow (20th February) to Sunday 3rd March, it’s a festival which over the years has firmly established itself as one of the very best around. Scots Whay Hae! will be in attendance to review the best of what’s on, but before it all kicks off here is our annual preview.

2019’s programme has so much to recommend it we couldn’t possibly do anything other than make some considered suggestions here, but you can and should download the full brochure, settle back, and peruse at your leisure.

However, before you do here’s a taste of what’s on offer:

You can keep updated throughout the festival on Facebook and on Twitter @glasgowfilmfest #GFF19 and you can sign up the the GFT Enewsletter which is not only essential for the festival, but all year round.

To whet appetites even further, here are the trailers for 10 films to look forward to. They include some of the best Scottish features at this year’s festival, as well as a few other highlights.

To find out more and buy tickets, click on the films’ titles.

Beats (N/C 18+)

The Science of Ghosts (N/C 12+)

Scotch – The Golden Dram (PG)

Prophecy (N/C 15+)

Final Ascent (N/C 12+)

Vox Lux (N/C 18+)

Luz (N/C 15+)

Under the Silver Lake (15)

The Witch: Part 1 – The Subversion (N/C 18+)

Midnight Cowboy (15)

Lights, Camera, Action!: A Preview Of Glasgow Film Festival 2018…

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If it’s February in Glasgow it can only be the Glasgow Film Festival, the perfect place for the more discerning film fans to take shelter from the storm while enjoying the best cinema has to offer, old and new.

Running from 21st February – 4th March, it’s a festival which over the years has firmly established itself as one of the very best around.

Scots Whay Hae! will be bringing  you interviews as well as the usual reviews, but before we do here is our annual preview.

2018’s programme has so much to recommend it we couldn’t possibly do anything other than make some considered suggestions here, but you can and should download the full brochure, settle back, and peruse at your leisure.

However, before you do here’s a taste of what’s on offer:

As ever,  there are various categories and strands to guide you towards whatever may be your cup of tea. This year they include Behind The ScenesRebel Heroes, Ireland: The Near Shore, CinemastersLocal HeroesSound & Vision, Modern Families, Stranger Than Fiction, Future Cult, PoineerWindow On The World, Crossing The Line, Pure Baltic and the always popular FrightFest.

Add to those some very special events at appropriate venues, a surprise film, school discos, a wide-selection of Gala events, the Glasgow Short Film Festival, the Glasgow Youth Film Festival, and many Special Guest appearances and interviews.

You can keep updated throughout the festival on Facebook and on Twitter @glasgowfilmfest #GFF18 and you can sign up the the GFT Enewsletter which is not only essential for the festival, but all year round. Continue reading

That Was The Year That Was: It’s The Best Of 2017 Podcasts – Part 1 (Film)…

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This year we are recording three separate Best Of 2017 podcasts, one each for film, music, and books. For the first two, Ali and Ian are once again joined by irregular podcast guest and resident film expert Chris Ward, and Scottish music man & manager, Wesley Shearer.

In this, Part I, we concentrate on the films of 2017, and give you some recommendations. As usual, Ali kicks things off talking about his favourite Scottish films of the year, including T2: Trainspotting, Daphne, Benny, The End Of The Game, and Lost In France before Chris and Wesley widen the discussion to talk about the best films they have seen in the last 12 months. As well as their recommendations, they talk about the continuing success of the Glasgow Film Festival, the growing influence of streaming services, the possible threat to cinemas, and more. Continue reading

You Have Been Watching…Benny

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Any informed discussion of the greatest all-time Scottish sports stars will throw up familiar names. Alongside the likes of Alan Wells, Liz McColgan, the Lisbon Lions, Andy Murray, Denis Law, Jackie Stewart and John Thomas ‘Jocky’ Wilson will be that of boxer Benny Lynch. However, the passing of time increases the risk that those who have been members of this elite group for the longest are in the greatest danger of being forgotten. The fact that the Lynch legend has lasted this long is testament to his impact on sports fans and beyond. Like Ali, Leonard, McGuigan and Chavez, he transcended the sport of boxing to become a national icon and hero. But Lynch last fought in 1938, lest we forget.

Andrew Gallimore’s documentary, Benny, which previewed at the Glasgow Film Festival last week, is timely for this very reason. It is not only a reminder of a great boxer, arguably one of the very best, but of a time and place, namely Glasgow in the 1920s and ’30s, which is also in danger of being forgotten. Glasgow was overpopulated, ripe and rotten, and at the heart of it was the Gorbals, which had a population density six-times higher than anywhere else in the city. Continue reading

Talking Movies At GFF17 – #3: An Interview With Bodkin Ras Director Kaweh Modiri…

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The third of our interviews with directors at this year’s Glasgow Film Festival is with Kaweh Modiri, a Dutch filmmaker of Iranian descent. Strange then, perhaps, that his film Bodkin Ras is set in the town of Forres in the north of Scotland, but such movement of people and place has been a feature of the films we have been highlighting at at this year’s festival, and those who have made them.

Our previous interviews have been with David Graham Scott, whose film The End Of The Game begins in Caithness and then moves to South Africa, and Hope Dickson Leach, who wrote The Levelling in Glasgow but filmed it in Somerset. You could make the claim, so I will, that they typify the Glasgow Film Festival in that they mix home with the international. Continue reading

You Have Been Watching…The End Of The Game

 

Our first film review of this year’s Glasgow Film Festival is of David Graham Scott’s The End Of The Game. And what a place to start. When documentary is at its best it trumps fiction every time as it gives us stranger and more telling tales. It is certainly the case that if someone was to write a character such as ‘Sir’ Guy Wallace, the focus of The End Of The Game, then an editor would dismiss him as being unbelievable. But when faced with the real thing, he is impossible to ignore.

He is a man whose story needs a film-maker as fair and even-handed as Graham Scott for audiences to see behind the facade and try to understand just what makes the man who he is. It would have been all too easy for the director to hold his subject up to ridicule. There is a lot of humour in the film, but it is as much pointed to the man behind the camera as to the one it is trained on, and much of it comes from their two very different  worlds colliding. But, as with the likes of fellow documentarian Jon Ronson, Scott tries to understand the personality and the driving passion of his subject. It is the result of an inquisitive mind, and one which is keen to see the best in people, even when initial evidence may prove otherwise. Other filmmakers could learn a lot in terms of approach and perspective Continue reading

Talking Movies At GFF17 – #2: An Interview With The Levelling Director Hope Dickson Leach…

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Hope Dickson Leach’s excellent The Levelling is at the GFT from the 12th – 18th May. Below is an interview with the director from earlier this year…

The Glasgow Film Festival offers something for everyone, but each year there are films which arrive having  created a buzz through word-of-mouth and critical reception. This certainly applies to The Levelling which had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival and it has been earning rave reviews wherever it has been shown. Continue reading

Stranger Than Fiction: The Scots Whay Hae! Podcast Talks To Documentary Maker Lou McLoughlan…

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The latest podcast has Ali talking to director and cinematographer Lou McLoughlan. We could pretend that it has been perfectly timed to coincide with the first week of this year’s Glasgow Film Festival, but in all honesty it’s an interview we’ve been trying to organise ever since watching Lou’s fantastic feature documentary 16 Years Till Summer, one of the best films of 2016.

You can read the Scots Whay Hae! review here, and see the trailer at the foot of this post, but it’s worth listening to the director talk about the making of it first as it will add to the viewing experience, and spoilers are carefully avoided.

The two also talk about the practicalities and difficulties of making documentaries, and then with getting them to an audience, particularly a Scottish one.

There is also chat about Scottish storytelling, the Highlands and Islands as a ‘seductive space’, the importance of music to a film, how filming real life will always offer up the unexpected, and much, much more. Continue reading

Talking Movies At GFF17 – #1: An Interview With The End Of The Game Director David Graham Scott…

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David Graham Scott’s The End Of The Game is described as “A bizarre journey to Africa with a vegan filmmaker and an old colonial big game hunter.” In truth, that description just scratches the surface of what may prove to be the most controversial film at this year’s Glasgow Film Festival, most probably for people who only engage with it on the most simple and perfunctory level. Those who are willing to look beyond the perceived stereotypes which that description suggests will discover a layered and complex picture of a man out of time facing his own mortality, and the disappearance of all that he once held as certain.

It is also as much about the director himself and his growing relationship with his leading man and his beliefs, and how they appear to directly oppose his own. Scott avoids bringing his own preconceptions to the making of the film, and that’s the way an audience should approach it as well. Continue reading