That’s Entertainment: A Review Of Scottish Opera’s The Magic Flute…

Few operas have found their way into popular culture in the manner of Mozart’s The Magic Flute. From Neil Gaiman’s adaptation of Papageno’s bird catcher for the character Old Bailey in his novel Neverwhere, Whitney Houston claiming she is the ‘Queen of the Night’ in the movie The Bodyguard, and with music which has been used to sell everything from cars to contraception, it’s influence has spread far and wide. This is something which Scottish Opera’s revival of their 2012 production plays with beautifully.

It embraces the aesthetic of steampunk fully. If you know the graphic novels of Alan Moore’s The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen, or films such as Brazil, Howl’s Moving Castle, or the recent Mortal Engines, you’ll have some idea of the look and feel. In fact the wizard Sarastro can be described as a mix of The Matrix’s Morpheus and Kenneth Branagh’s Dr. Arliss Loveless from the otherwise forgettable Wild Wild West.

Throw in minions who seem to be a marriage of Disney’s Minions & Tik Tok from Return To Oz, a dragon which is more H.G. Wells than Game Of Thrones, and strange men in top hats who watch over proceedings, and it’s clear that everyone has risen to the challenge to offer up a production which is as much a treat for the eyes as for the ears. Those involved with stage, costume, lighting and props should take a well-deserved bow.

But for all the magic and magnificence of the staging what runs through this production is heart, humanity and humour. Central to this is Richard Burkhard’s Papageno who represents the everyman, the link between the audience and the stage, (the ‘Buttons’ character, so to speak – see more below), whose mistakes and mishaps are all too recognisable, and who reminds us that while not everyone can be a hero, they still deserve love.

There is more than a touch of pantomime about The Magic Flute with a prince and a princess, a wicked Queen, slapstick and farce, playing to the gallery, and (*Spoiler*) happy endings for most by the time the curtain falls. As such it is easy to explain its continued popularity, regarded by many as the opera for all the family, and there is an excellent piece in the programme by Paul Maloney which sets out the influence on vaudeville and music hall.

If you’ve been looking to introduce someone to the joys of opera, then Scottish Opera’s The Magic Flute is the perfect choice. If that someone is you, then why not give it a chance. I guarantee you’ll leave with a smile on your face and a song in your heart.

Thanks to Scottish Opera for use of the following images:
Credit – James Glossop

Tour Dates:

Theatre Royal – GLASGOW Tue 14 May to Sat 18 May BOOK TICKETS

Eden Court – INVERNESS Tue 21 May to Sat 25 May BOOK TICKETS

His Majesty’s Theatre – ABERDEEN Thu 30 May – Sat 1 Jun BOOK TICKETS

Festival Theatre – EDINBURGH Wed 5 Jun to Sat 15 Jun BOOK TICKETS

Hackney Empire – LONDON Thu 20 Jun to Sat 22 Jun BOOK TICKETS

Belfast Grand Opera House – BELFAST Thu 27 Jun – Sat 29 Jun BOOK TICKETS

One thought on “That’s Entertainment: A Review Of Scottish Opera’s The Magic Flute…

  1. interesting, I would generally agree that the Magic Flute is an ideal ‘First Opera’ for anyone. But that plan CAN go horribly wrong as I discovered when I donated tickets for the Flute in Stockholm last year to a friend , new to opera, who was visiting that city. The production was SO strange/complex/unfathomable they will probably never darken the opera again (even I, an old Flute hand was totally BAMBOOZLED when I saw that production some months later). So Well done Scottish Opera for this totally entertaining and accessible production which everyone will enjoy.

    Liked by 1 person

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